Podiatrist - New Iberia
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Posts for: May, 2013

 

Mark Harrison, an undrafted free agent from Rutgers, was predicted to be in the seventh round draft pick for the Chicago Bears, until a foot injury held him back from rookie minicamp at Halas Hall. After a workout on May 13, Harrison stepped awkwardly and suffered a fractured fifth metatarsal. He underwent surgery to repair the bone, and is currently recovering. He is expected to be ready for training camp with hopes the Bears will give him another look down the road.

Fractured bones in the foot are quite common, but are usually not very disabling and usually do not need surgical treatment. However, a fracture to the fifth metatarsal, such as the one Harrison experienced, can be more difficult to heal depending on the location of the fracture site, in which case surgery may be an appropriate intervention. A fracture may present with pain, swelling and sometimes bruising.  It is a common misperception that if you can walk on your foot, it is not broken.  That is not the case and neglecting a fracture can lead to long term pain and possible disability. 

Although Harrison’s chances of being drafted may have been affected by this injury, he has been doing a great job turning heads in the NFL with his performance for the Scarlet Knights. With an impressive 40-yard dash time, and good performance statistics, Harrison will be an exciting pick when he is healthy. 

If you ever experience a sports injury, or fear you may have experienced a fracture, it is important to seek medical attention to ensure proper healing. Schedule an appointment with Dr. Jon Purdy at The Foot Clinic and get diagnosed and put your mind at ease.

Jon Purdy, DPM


 

With the NBA play-offs in full spin, many fans are watching every moment and hoping their teams stay healthy until the end. However, with intense games comes injuries, and most teams are feeling the heat of having some of their best players on the bench. The Brooklyn Nets have been closely watching Joe Johnson, who has been battling plantar fasciitis since February.

Plantar Fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain occurring in people of all ages and activity levels. The plantar fascia is a band of thick tissue on the bottom of the foot that supports the arch, which starts at the back of the heel, and fans out toward the toes. The condition arises due to inflammation of the fascia, and is aggravated by a variety of factors including tight calf muscles, obesity, improper shoe gear, and in Johnson’s case, long periods of intense activity on hard surfaces. This aggravation can cause pain and swelling to the area and can be quite debilitating for some people.

After missing five games earlier this season, Johnson has been icing his foot in hopes it will not hold him back from play-off opportunities. Johnson explains that he has his good days and bad days, and sometimes the pain lingers here and there. Despite receiving injections into the heel to help with the pain before the start of the games, he has struggled on the court lately. Plantar Fasciitis can be difficult to treat, and resting the injury is only one part of what is usually a multi-treatment recovery period. Hopefully he can receive the rest and further treatment he needs now that the Nets’ playoff season is over.

Heel pain is a very common condition that many adults endure. It is ALWAYS better to treat this immediately as it get more difficult to treat if left undiagnosed or self-treated.  If you experience heel pain be sure to schedule an appointment with Dr. Purdy at The Foot Clinic!

Dr. Purdy, DPM


 

Kobe Bryant’s season ended in the blink of an eye after a routine move during a basketball game a few weeks ago. After receiving an MRI after his injury, his fear was made a reality: his Achilles tendon was torn and his season was over. After undergoing surgery, the Lakers announced he is expected to miss six to nine months of play for rehabilitation of his injury.

The Achilles tendon is the largest tendon in the body, and can withstand forces of over 1,000 pounds!  It is also the most commonly ruptured tendon in the body, most often from a sports injury.  People who are most at risk for an Achilles rupture are athletes, people of older age, people who have experienced previous injury or rupture to the tendon, or changes in activity, including strenuous training. Treatment for an Achilles rupture is usually surgical, with months of rehabilitation needed to strengthen the tendon again and gain normal range of motion.

After pushing off with his left foot to move past an opponent, Bryant fell to the court after feeling a “pop” as if someone had kicked him. Bryant stayed in the game long enough to complete his free throws after a foul was called on the play, but did not return to the game after contributing 34 total points that night. “I made a move I’ve made a million times and it popped”, said Bryant, calling this injury the most disappointing of his career by far.

If Bryant is able to return in six months he could potentially be able to participate in the Laker’s regular season opener in October. However, if his recovery takes the full nine months, he will be expected to return in January.

This not only happens to athletes, it is a debilitating injury in non-athletes.  If you ever experience pain in your Achilles tendon, be sure to set up an appointment right away with Dr. Purdy at The Foot Clinic.

Dr. Jon Purdy, DPM




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