Podiatrist - New Iberia
1100 Andre Street Suite 202
New Iberia, LA 70563
P (337)  256-8494
F (337) 256-8945

 

 

A recent study by the College of Podiatry in the UK revealed that wearing high heels can cause permanent damage to your feet, ranging from stress fractures, nerve entrapment and arthritis. Although heels are quite appealing to women and often the perfect accessory to a well thought out outfit, 20 percent of women in the study admitted to feeling pain from heels after only 20 minutes of wear. This may be related to the idea that one-third of women admitted to wearing the wrong size heel simply because they looked nice, and because they could not find a pair in their size. Sounds like most women out there are willing to be in pain for the sake of fashion. Another interesting statistic is that 28 percent of women admitted to dancing barefoot because they could not tolerate the pain anymore, while one-third walked home barefoot.

Women are more likely to suffer from foot issues than men, and twice as likely to suffer from corns, cracked heels, and bunions. Given only 12 percent of men have chosen painful shoes for the sake of style, compared to 43 percent of women, it seems clear why women are suffering with foot pain. In addition to this, 19 percent of women did not seek medical help for their foot problems because they felt it was unimportant.

Although heels may look nice, a more appropriate shoe could save your feet. Issues such as those listed above can result in surgery if left to worsen, and can contribute to long-standing pain. If heels are something you cannot live without, don’t be the 19 percent who believe their foot complaints are unimportant. Foot pain is telling you there is a problem. Schedule an appointment with Dr. Purdy at The Foot Clinic and learn about treatment options that can resolve your foot pain.

Jonathan Purdy, DPM

 

Running events that involve obstacles are becoming more popular with runners and non-runners alike. Events like Tough Mudder, Warrior Dash, and Spartan Races are getting jotted down on more calendars each year, and are motivating new fitness goals and bragging rights on Facebook. Many of these runs boast strenuous physical exertion while providing a fun, often team oriented environment. This combination attracts many physically fit individuals as well as those who haven’t been keeping up with their health as zealously. These events usually require a release form in case of injury, which is why it’s important for participants to be aware of the obstacles they will be undertaking.

At the Silverdale Mud Run, a police offer who participated decided to sue the organizers involved after shattering her ankle on an obstacle at the event. Two others also joined the suit after ankle injuries and foot fractures sustained at the same obstacle, called “Gravity’s Revenge”, which displayed a steep slope that allowed participants to slide down into a water bed on a tarp. The slope was cleared of debris and kept slick to assist in the slide, but participants argued there was no regulation of speed down the slope. Runners that slid down the slope were stopped abruptly by an impact of rocks at the bottom of the obstacle. This impact, mixed with the long run the participants had endured, caused ankle and foot fractures, according to the runners. Fractures can involve long rehabilitation and can make it difficult to return to a career that involves long hours on your feet. This was the case for Wendy Davis, the police officer who sustained an ankle fracture from the event.

Although these events can be an exciting change from the same gym routine, it is important for participants to be aware of all the obstacles at an event. Most events provide a detailed description of the obstacles that will be present and all events provide alternatives for people who are not comfortable doing a certain obstacle, or provide ways to bypass obstacles. Participants should be aware of their limits with these events—there are not special medals for the people who do every obstacle and get hurt!  Things that involve slopes, jumps, or twisting can put you more at risk for an injury, especially when you’re muscle are fatigued and not working at their best.

If you anticipate running in a “Mud Run”, or any outdoor course for that matter, be sure to look at all the obstacles involved and map out your personal route for the race, including which obstacles you may want to bypass to ensure your safety. Take the advice of the training regimens provided by the races, and know your own limits as to what events may be too strenuous for your activity level. As always, Have Fun!

If you do experience an injury after a race or event, be sure to schedule an appointment with Dr. Purdy at The Foot Clinic. It’s important to pay attention to pain and not mistake “routine soreness” after an event with a serious injury. Listen to your body, and what doesn’t quite feel right probably isn’t right!

Dr. Jon Purdy

 

Mark Harrison, an undrafted free agent from Rutgers, was predicted to be in the seventh round draft pick for the Chicago Bears, until a foot injury held him back from rookie minicamp at Halas Hall. After a workout on May 13, Harrison stepped awkwardly and suffered a fractured fifth metatarsal. He underwent surgery to repair the bone, and is currently recovering. He is expected to be ready for training camp with hopes the Bears will give him another look down the road.

Fractured bones in the foot are quite common, but are usually not very disabling and usually do not need surgical treatment. However, a fracture to the fifth metatarsal, such as the one Harrison experienced, can be more difficult to heal depending on the location of the fracture site, in which case surgery may be an appropriate intervention. A fracture may present with pain, swelling and sometimes bruising.  It is a common misperception that if you can walk on your foot, it is not broken.  That is not the case and neglecting a fracture can lead to long term pain and possible disability. 

Although Harrison’s chances of being drafted may have been affected by this injury, he has been doing a great job turning heads in the NFL with his performance for the Scarlet Knights. With an impressive 40-yard dash time, and good performance statistics, Harrison will be an exciting pick when he is healthy. 

If you ever experience a sports injury, or fear you may have experienced a fracture, it is important to seek medical attention to ensure proper healing. Schedule an appointment with Dr. Jon Purdy at The Foot Clinic and get diagnosed and put your mind at ease.

Jon Purdy, DPM

 

With the NBA play-offs in full spin, many fans are watching every moment and hoping their teams stay healthy until the end. However, with intense games comes injuries, and most teams are feeling the heat of having some of their best players on the bench. The Brooklyn Nets have been closely watching Joe Johnson, who has been battling plantar fasciitis since February.

Plantar Fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain occurring in people of all ages and activity levels. The plantar fascia is a band of thick tissue on the bottom of the foot that supports the arch, which starts at the back of the heel, and fans out toward the toes. The condition arises due to inflammation of the fascia, and is aggravated by a variety of factors including tight calf muscles, obesity, improper shoe gear, and in Johnson’s case, long periods of intense activity on hard surfaces. This aggravation can cause pain and swelling to the area and can be quite debilitating for some people.

After missing five games earlier this season, Johnson has been icing his foot in hopes it will not hold him back from play-off opportunities. Johnson explains that he has his good days and bad days, and sometimes the pain lingers here and there. Despite receiving injections into the heel to help with the pain before the start of the games, he has struggled on the court lately. Plantar Fasciitis can be difficult to treat, and resting the injury is only one part of what is usually a multi-treatment recovery period. Hopefully he can receive the rest and further treatment he needs now that the Nets’ playoff season is over.

Heel pain is a very common condition that many adults endure. It is ALWAYS better to treat this immediately as it get more difficult to treat if left undiagnosed or self-treated.  If you experience heel pain be sure to schedule an appointment with Dr. Purdy at The Foot Clinic!

Dr. Purdy, DPM

 

Kobe Bryant’s season ended in the blink of an eye after a routine move during a basketball game a few weeks ago. After receiving an MRI after his injury, his fear was made a reality: his Achilles tendon was torn and his season was over. After undergoing surgery, the Lakers announced he is expected to miss six to nine months of play for rehabilitation of his injury.

The Achilles tendon is the largest tendon in the body, and can withstand forces of over 1,000 pounds!  It is also the most commonly ruptured tendon in the body, most often from a sports injury.  People who are most at risk for an Achilles rupture are athletes, people of older age, people who have experienced previous injury or rupture to the tendon, or changes in activity, including strenuous training. Treatment for an Achilles rupture is usually surgical, with months of rehabilitation needed to strengthen the tendon again and gain normal range of motion.

After pushing off with his left foot to move past an opponent, Bryant fell to the court after feeling a “pop” as if someone had kicked him. Bryant stayed in the game long enough to complete his free throws after a foul was called on the play, but did not return to the game after contributing 34 total points that night. “I made a move I’ve made a million times and it popped”, said Bryant, calling this injury the most disappointing of his career by far.

If Bryant is able to return in six months he could potentially be able to participate in the Laker’s regular season opener in October. However, if his recovery takes the full nine months, he will be expected to return in January.

This not only happens to athletes, it is a debilitating injury in non-athletes.  If you ever experience pain in your Achilles tendon, be sure to set up an appointment right away with Dr. Purdy at The Foot Clinic.

Dr. Jon Purdy, DPM





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